Archive for the ‘Dog Tails’ Category

For the policemen of Manhattan’s Leonard Street Station, doing strike duty in Brooklyn meant spending a lot of time riding on the trolley cars looking for trouble. It was during this week that they “adopted” a big, brown, shaggy dog who would change their lives for the better. They named him Strike.

For years, Grumpy Bizallion’s monument was the tallest at Hartsdale Pet Cemetery in New York, standing just over six feet.

“The public clamored for news of this wealthy family—celebrated as much for its celibacy as its eccentricity—and the press obliged. Despite a fortune built on fur and real estate, the eight Wendel siblings shunned high society, ensconcing themselves in an antiquated house of mystery amid the cacophonous commerce of midtown Manhattan. There, starved of society […]

One day in September 1903, the Larsons took a trip to Manhattan Beach in Brooklyn. The weather was obviously pleasant, because they left a window open in their apartment at 246 West 114th Street in Harlem. This window led to a fire escape, which was a favorite sleeping spot for their Irish setter, Dane.

One day in September 1903, the Larsons took a trip to Manhattan Beach in Brooklyn. The weather was obviously pleasant, because they left a window open in their apartment at 246 West 114th Street in Harlem. This window led to a fire escape, which was a favorite sleeping spot for their Irish setter, Dane.

In 1891, Hurlbut Chapman, a once prominent lawyer from Rye, New York, leased the old John C. Bergen homestead at 972 Flatbush Avenue, at the corner of Avenue A (today’s Albemarle Road). There, he opened the Whitby Kennels, where he boarded the dogs and cats of wealthy New Yorkers.

This is one of my longer stories — which is why it took me so long to post — but it’s chock full of New York City history. In July 2013, I wrote about the police dogs of Parkville Brooklyn, who came to America in 1907 and were the first canine police squad in New […]

“Her death last year was the hardest to bear of any – until his came. Somehow I like to think that her little soul was waiting to greet his, so that he mightn’t feel strange or alone in the great world above us. I can see her jumping and running for joy and licking his […]

Although the story of Yankee Stone is not very interesting on its own, the people and places surrounding the dog and his death are quite fascinating, and provide a unique look at high society Brooklyn during the Gilded Age. “The good citizens who reside in the aristocratic Clinton Avenue section were startled last night by […]

During vaudeville’s heyday in the late 1800s and early 1900s, animal performances were a dime a dozen on New York stages and rooftop gardens. Performing dogs like Dan the Drunken Dog and Don the Talking Dog were favorites with the crowds at places like Hammerstein’s Roof Garden and Tony Pastor’s Fourteenth Street Theatre. One of […]