Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

We last left off at the the car stables of the 42nd St. and Grand St. Ferry Railroad, on the east side of Twelfth Ave. It is the night of June 12, 1886, and about a dozen cats are fighting for their lives as a large fire burns their home to the ground…

Part I of this Old New York cat tale begins in 1825 at the old Hermitage Farm on the west side of Manhattan, where a large horse car depot was built in 1864.

This story is not for the squeamish but it’s an important story to tell as it says a lot about society in New York City beforer the Civil War. Plus, there’s a lot of talk about Russian bears in the political news these days, so it’s a timely tale to tell.

In this final chapter of Crispin’s Crispian, I’ll tell the fascinating story of what happened to the old New York farmhouse where his famous pet mom, Margaret Wise Brown, wrote her final children’s book, Mister Dog

In the 1940s, author Margaret Wise Brown rented a tiny frame house on East 71st Street. The house, where she wrote her final book, has a fascinating history.

In February 1966, the demolition of several old buildings on York Avenue between East 71st Street and East 72nd Street revealed a very tiny frame house where a dog once inspired author Margaret Wise Brown.

Trent, the tabby cat made famous by an unsuccessful flight across the Atlantic in the airship America, wowed the crowds at Gimbels in New York City.

In July 1900, Mrs. John T. Stephens lost the canine love of her life. Having lost her young son just two years before, the death of her dog Major was more than she could bear.

When we left Part I of this curious cat tale of Old New York, young Margaret Owen was just about to dunk her two Angora cats, Lilly and Otto, into a basin of blue dye. The blue cats would look great parading on the boardwalk at Atlantic City.

Every once and a while I come across an old animal story that goes into my special folder called “You Can’t Make This Stuff Up.” The following cat tale is somewhat funny, very bizarre, and a bit tragic.