Archive for the ‘Animal Attractions’ Category

This story is not for the squeamish but it’s an important story to tell as it says a lot about society in New York City beforer the Civil War. Plus, there’s a lot of talk about Russian bears in the political news these days, so it’s a timely tale to tell.

Part 3 of a 3-part story about Isaac Van Amburgh, the Richmond Hill estate in Greenwich Village, and New York’s Zoological Institute in the Bowery

Part 3 of a 3-part story about Isaac Van Amburgh, the Richmond Hill estate in Greenwich Village, and New York’s Zoological Institute in the Bowery

In the fall of 1833, Isaac Van Amburgh announced his plans to step into a cage occupied by a lion, a tiger, a leopard, and a panther at the Richmond Hill Theatre in Greenwich Village. Strong appeals were made for him to cancel this performance, but he would not back down.

Morgan L. Phillips was an old circus man who lived with his wife, a horse, and a few dogs in a canvas tent in an empty lot at 40 Cherry Street in New York City in 1893-94.

Once upon a time, before New York City’s “deep East Side” was razed to make way for new public housing projects, there was a little colonial-era street just north of the Brooklyn Bridge called Roosevelt Street, where Donald Burns sold wild animals.

When most of us hear the name P.T. Barnum, we automatically think of the circus and “The Greatest Show on Earth.” But many years before P.T. Barnum’s Grand Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan, and Circus made its debut in 1870 — and 40 years before he partnered with James A. Bailey – Phineas Taylor Barnum rose […]

Billed as the amazing high diving horses, King and Queen were two pure white Arabian horses who had a knack for diving on their own from great heights into almost any body of water.

Ever since the first Christmas tree went up in 1931, and the outdoor skating rink opened in 1936, Rockefeller Center has been associated with ice skaters and the winter holiday season. But what many people may not know is that the Prometheus Fountain in the sunken plaza at Rockefeller Center has also been home to […]

“This is a novel importation; but if the experiment should prove successful, it may become one of some importance to the improvement of the growth of wool on this continent.” New York Herald, December 16, 1857 On December 15, 1857, 42 llamas arrived in New York City on the Panama Railroad Company’s brig E. Drummond […]