Posts Tagged ‘New York History’

NBC’s Katie Couric struck a nerve with the Dutch during the Pyeonchang Olympic Opening Ceremonies by saying the reason the Netherlands is so dominant in speed skating is because “skating is an important mode of transportation” for the people of Amsterdam when the canals freeze over. There was quite a lot of backlash from the viewers, […]

“It is not surprising and will scarcely cause any comment if some soft-hearted or soft-brained woman goes into hysterics over the death of her pet dog or cat, and gives herself up to the most extravagant grief over his demise, but the spectacle of a veteran soldier who fought with distinction in the Civil War, […]

What happens when an Indiana bear, a Harlem goat, a large crowd of people, and a Wild West cowboy with a silver-plated revolver all come together at a beer garden on the beach? Yes, the following story is from my file called “You Can’t Make This Stuff Up.” On January 8, 1886, two Harlem men […]

Comments Off on 1936: The Cat-Saving Fire Dog Hero of Brooklyn’ s Engine Company No. 203

In 1936, Nip*, the veteran fire dog of Brooklyn’s Engine Company No. 203, won four medals of honor for heroism from the following agencies: New York Women’s League for Animals Dog’s World International American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals New York Anti-Vivisection Society During his years of service with the engine company, Nip had demonstrated many acts of bravery […]

East Harlem merchant G. Herman Gottlieb had a little knowledge of botany and a great desire to make some quick cash. So he left his home at 188 East 99th Street with two empty baskets and made his way to the wooded area on Dyckman Street in the Inwood section of Manhattan. There, he worked all day long […]

A while back, I wrote about a cat named Duffy McNab, who lost his life when he tried to jump from his ship to Pier 64 on the Hudson River. When Duffy fell into the river, Quartermaster Angus MacLean jumped into the water and tried to save him. In the following story, I’ll tell you […]

When New York City Policeman James Breen joined the Leonard Street Station in the late 19th century, he probably never dreamed that one day he’d have to play the role of a Wild West cowboy in Manhattan on West Street, at the Chambers Street Ferry Terminal. In the late 19th century, West Street was always crowded […]

The following cat story of Old Brooklyn is courtesy of The Brownstone Detectives, who first published this tale in March 2017. I take the story one step further by exploring the history around the Grand Street Museum and the land on which it was once located.  Agent Clark Investigates a Report of Cruelty to Cats […]

Some studies have shown that where you’re born has a huge impact on how far you’ll go in life. I think the same holds true for cats, especially those who are born in large cities like New York. When Abe’s mother cat gave birth to three kittens in New York City’s Time Square neighborhood in […]

Comments Off on 1926: The Last of the Bowling Green Cat Massacres in New York City’s “Little Syria,” Part I

The Bowling Green Cat Roundup “When darkness settled down last night over the territory encompassed by West Street and Broadway, Vesey Street and the Battery, and lights began to blink in the tenement quarters of Syrians, Turks, Hungarians and Russians, eerie dirges rose from pitchy backyards. There was a melancholia in the walls, a lost […]