Posts Tagged ‘Old New York’

Prelude to the 1914 Cat Attack In the early morning hours of November 4, 1911, a bomb went off in front of a butcher shop and coffee saloon on the northwest corner of James Street and Oak Street in New York City’s Lower East Side. The explosion could be heard two blocks away at the […]

When New York City Policeman James Breen joined the Leonard Street Station in the late 19th century, he probably never dreamed that one day he’d have to play the role of a Wild West cowboy in Manhattan on West Street, at the Chambers Street Ferry Terminal. In the late 19th century, West Street was always crowded […]

Comments Off on 1906: Lions, and Tigers and Cats and Dogs, Oh My! The Menagerie at 42 Bleecker Street, Part 2

In the first part of this Old New York menagerie tale, we met taxidermist Fred Sauter Jr., a well-known New York City taxidermist who did a thriving business stuffing deer, bears, lions, birds, monkeys, and even pet dogs and cats in his large warehouse at 42 Bleecker Street. In Part 2, we’ll explore the history […]

Fred Sauter did a thriving business stuffing deer, bears, lions, birds, monkeys, and even pet dogs and cats in his large warehouse at 42 Bleecker Street .

Comments Off on 1895: Taffy, The Laird, and the Clowder of Town Topics Office Cats on Fifth Avenue

Although they did not take home any ribbons, a trio of black cats belonging to Colonel William D’Alton Mann, publisher of the Town Topics society magazine, were the center of attraction at New York City’s first official cat show.

In Part II of this Old New York dog tale, we’ll explore the old Casper Samler Farm and re-visit the three bulldogs in their home at the Gilsey House.

Comments Off on 1889: The Princess and the Pampered French Bulldogs Who Lived at the Gilsey House in New York City, Part I

This story is about three French bulldogs, the first cricket club in New York City, an old farm, and a grand hotel called Gilsey House. It stars a pseudo-princess named Aimée Isabella Crocker Ashe Gillig Gouraud Miskinoff Galitzine. If I had the ability, I’d turn this Old New York tale into a movie. Part I: Aimée […]

In this final chapter of Crispin’s Crispian, I’ll tell the fascinating story of what happened to the old New York farmhouse where his famous pet mom, Margaret Wise Brown, wrote her final children’s book, Mister Dog

In the 1940s, author Margaret Wise Brown rented a tiny frame house on East 71st Street. The house, where she wrote her final book, has a fascinating history.

Comments Off on 1922: The Curious Case of Lilly and Otto, the Dyed-Blue Cats of Midtown Manhattan, Part II

When we left Part I of this curious cat tale of Old New York, young Margaret Owen was just about to dunk her two Angora cats, Lilly and Otto, into a basin of blue dye. The blue cats would look great parading on the boardwalk at Atlantic City.