Posts Tagged ‘Old New York’

In the first part of this Old New York menagerie tale, we met taxidermist Fred Sauter Jr., a well-known New York City taxidermist who did a thriving business stuffing deer, bears, lions, birds, monkeys, and even pet dogs and cats in his large warehouse at 42 Bleecker Street. In Part 2, we’ll explore the history […]

Fred Sauter did a thriving business stuffing deer, bears, lions, birds, monkeys, and even pet dogs and cats in his large warehouse at 42 Bleecker Street .

Although they did not take home any ribbons, a trio of black cats belonging to Colonel William D’Alton Mann, publisher of the Town Topics society magazine, were the center of attraction at New York City’s first official cat show.

In Part II of this Old New York dog tale, we’ll explore the old Casper Samler Farm and re-visit the three bulldogs in their home at the Gilsey House.

This story is about three French bulldogs, the first cricket club in New York City, an old farm, and a grand hotel called Gilsey House. It stars a pseudo-princess named Aimée Isabella Crocker Ashe Gillig Gouraud Miskinoff Galitzine. If I had the ability, I’d turn this Old New York tale into a movie. Part I: Aimée […]

In this final chapter of Crispin’s Crispian, I’ll tell the fascinating story of what happened to the old New York farmhouse where his famous pet mom, Margaret Wise Brown, wrote her final children’s book, Mister Dog

In the 1940s, author Margaret Wise Brown rented a tiny frame house on East 71st Street. The house, where she wrote her final book, has a fascinating history.

When we left Part I of this curious cat tale of Old New York, young Margaret Owen was just about to dunk her two Angora cats, Lilly and Otto, into a basin of blue dye. The blue cats would look great parading on the boardwalk at Atlantic City.

Every once and a while I come across an old animal story that goes into my special folder called “You Can’t Make This Stuff Up.” The following cat tale is somewhat funny, very bizarre, and a bit tragic.

For the policemen of Manhattan’s Leonard Street Station, doing strike duty in Brooklyn meant spending a lot of time riding on the trolley cars looking for trouble. It was during this week that they “adopted” a big, brown, shaggy dog who would change their lives for the better. They named him Strike.