Posts Tagged ‘Old New York’

In Part II of this Old New York dog tale, we’ll explore the old Casper Samler Farm and re-visit the three bulldogs in their home at the Gilsey House.

This story is about three French bulldogs, the first cricket club in New York City, an old farm, and a grand hotel called Gilsey House. It stars a pseudo-princess named Aimée Isabella Crocker Ashe Gillig Gouraud Miskinoff Galitzine. If I had the ability, I’d turn this Old New York tale into a movie. Part I: Aimée […]

In this final chapter of Crispin’s Crispian, I’ll tell the fascinating story of what happened to the old New York farmhouse where his famous pet mom, Margaret Wise Brown, wrote her final children’s book, Mister Dog

In the 1940s, author Margaret Wise Brown rented a tiny frame house on East 71st Street. The house, where she wrote her final book, has a fascinating history.

When we left Part I of this curious cat tale of Old New York, young Margaret Owen was just about to dunk her two Angora cats, Lilly and Otto, into a basin of blue dye. The blue cats would look great parading on the boardwalk at Atlantic City.

Every once and a while I come across an old animal story that goes into my special folder called “You Can’t Make This Stuff Up.” The following cat tale is somewhat funny, very bizarre, and a bit tragic.

For the policemen of Manhattan’s Leonard Street Station, doing strike duty in Brooklyn meant spending a lot of time riding on the trolley cars looking for trouble. It was during this week that they “adopted” a big, brown, shaggy dog who would change their lives for the better. They named him Strike.

Union Square Jim was a large, blue-eyed, orange tabby mascot of the old Union Square Theatre in New York City. Jim was born in the theater sometime around 1886, a year after James Hill took over as manager of the theater.

Like most cats that became the popular mascots of New York City police stations, fire stations, hotels, and theaters in the 1800s and 1900s, Jim began his life as a vagrant cat without friends or influence. It didn’t take him long, however, to win the hearts of the managers, actors, and patrons of the old Union Square Theatre.

Two weeks after the Equitable Life fire, workmen who were trying to salvage the contents of the cellar vaults and safe boxes rescued a cat named Kaiser and a black guinea pig later named Miss Bacillus.